Super Sample Superstore Descriptive

Super Sample Superstore

This interactive data visualization evaluates the Sample – Superstore dataset that comes with every download of Tableau. This project was created to train Tableau users on Tableau tactics, data visualization strategy, and design. If you are interested in following along, please see the list of related resources with explanations below the visualization. You can also subscribe for free to be the first to receive weekly Tableau tips and tutorials.

To use the visualization, start by choosing a date range and a region to highlight. Once highlighted, a US state within a region can be clicked on to filter the descriptive dashboard. You can also choose to look at the performance over equal periods or year over year and/or choose the date granularity (i.e. year, quarter, month, week) of the trend lines.

The prescriptive dashboard can be used to gain insight into the performance shown on the descriptive dashboard. Try out the annotations tab to enter your own insights on the fly!

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Super Bowl Margin of Victories Feature

Super Bowl Margins of Victory

This interactive data visualization looks at the margins of victory during every Super Bowl ever played. As of 2017, 51 Super Bowls have been played with the NFC winning 26 times and the AFC winning 25 times. The highest margin of victory in Super Bowl history was Super Bowl XXIV when the San Francisco 49ers beat the Denver Broncos by 45 points (55 to 10). Interestingly, the lowest margin of victory was one year later when the New York Giants beat the Buffalo Bills by a single point (20-19).

To read this visualization, the circle on top is the winning score for each Super Bowl, the circle on the bottom is the losing score for each Super Bowl, and the gray line is the margin of victory / defeat. The circles are color-coded with red representing the AFC and blue representing the NFC.  The end user can click the color legend in the top left corner of the visualization to highlight scores for the AFC or NFC. They can also hover over any data point to get the Super Bowl number, point total per team, and margin of victory.

The data for this visualization were sourced from Wikipedia. You can visit the page by clicking the link in the bottom left corner of the visualization.

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Doomsday Clock Feature

2½ Minutes to Midnight

This interactive data visualization looks at changes in The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists’ Doomsday Clock between 1947 and 2017. Upon being set at “7 minutes to midnight in 1947”, the hands on the clock have changed position 22 times for various reasons. Most recently, the clock changed to 2.5 minutes to midnight in January 2017; this is the closest to midnight the clock has been since 1953.

The end user can hover over any data point in the visualization to see the year, minutes to midnight during that year, the change from the previous position, and the reason the clocked moved position that year. The clock, nor this visualization, are meant to be political. You can read FAQs about the clock by clicking the link in the top right corner of the visualization. I was interested in visualizing this story to quickly see the history of nuclear and other global threats.

The data and descriptions for this visualization were sourced from Wikipedia. You can visit the page by clicking the link in the bottom left corner of the visualization.

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Odds of Going Pro in Sports

What are the Odds of Going Pro in Sports?

This interactive data visualization shows the odds of a high school athlete making it onto a college team and then going on to play professionally. The end user can choose between male or female athletes and from four different sports including basketball, baseball / softball, soccer, and hockey. After a selection is made, the funnel will update to show the total number of high school athletes, the number of high school athletes that go on to play on a college team, and of those, how many get drafted onto a professional team each year.

This visualization includes major sports in which both males and females have a chance to advance from high school to the top tier league within the US in their respective genders. For this reason, the visualization does not include football. If you are looking for how many high school football players go on to play in college and get drafted to the NFL, there are 1,121,744 boys playing high school football. Of those, 87,256 play in college (1 in 13), and 254 are drafted to the NFL (1 in 4,416 who play in high school; 1 in 344 who play in college).

The data for this visualization was sourced from scholarshipstats.com.

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The Cost of Attending Super Bowl 50

The Cost of Attending Super Bowl 50

This interactive data visualization shows the lowest ticket price per section for Super Bowl 50. The heat map of Levi’s Stadium, site of Super Bowl 50, displays the 14-day average of the lowest ticket price in each section, while the line graph shows the lowest ticket price per day. The user can hover over the stadium map for additional information or click a section in the stadium map to filter the 14-day trend for that section. The user can also hover over each point on the line graph for additional information.

Super Bowl tickets are sold almost exclusively on the secondary market, so all ticket prices were recorded from StubHub each day between 1/25/2016 and 2/7/2016 (the day of Super Bowl 50).

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Frequency of Winning Powerball Numbers

Frequency of Winning Powerball Numbers

This interactive data visualization shows the distribution of winning Powerball numbers drawn during the lottery, which is conducted twice per week. The user can hover over the bar for each number for additional insight. You can also hover over the gears in the top right corner for the methodology used when creating this visualization.

The data source for this visualization is the data from 1,897 Powerball drawings starting on November 5th, 1997. The pieces of data are provided by Powerball’s freqency distribution tables on their website. You can view the original data source by clicking in the bottom left corner of the visualization.

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We're Not In Kansas Anymore

We’re Not in Kansas Anymore

This interactive data visualization was created to document the travels of Amy and Ryan Sleeper of Kansas City. This visualization was created in Tableau using a custom Mapbox map. Double-click on the map to zoom in to see the custom pencil styling of the map. Clicking the home / pin icon in the top left corner of the map will reset the zoom.

The end user can use the drop-down menu to choose a trip that the family has taken and the path map will reflect the itinerary for that trip. The gauges at the top show the number of miles traveled on each trip by plane, ship, car, and train. Hovering over the gauges will display percentages compared to all-time miles for each mode of transportation. Clicking on any location will open a Google Image search for that location.

The data for this visualization was compiled from Google Maps.

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MLB-Integration-by-Team

Major League Baseball Integration by Team

This interactive data visualization shows when each team in Major League Baseball became integrated and tells the story of how long it took for MLB integration to begin. Most know that Jackie Robinson was the first black player to play in MLB, but Larry Doby of the Cleveland Indians and Hank Thompson of the St. Louis Browns also made in their debuts in 1947. The Boston Red Sox were the last team to become integrated, when Pumpsie Green took the field in 1959.

To interact with this visualization, click any of the blue bars to load a short video biography of a Hall of Fame player.

The data for this visualization was sourced from baseball-reference.com. You can click on the “About This Viz” tab for more information about the sources and how it was created.

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NFL Interconference Records Feature

50 Years of AFC vs. NFC Matchups

This interactive data visualization shows NFL interconference records for every matchup between the AFC and NFC during the first 51 years of the NFL. There have been 47 regular seasons since the NFL merger in 1960. There have also been four Super Bowls before the merger, bringing the total years of interconference play to 51. The user can hover over any of the seasons or the row for Super Bowls to see which conference had a better record against the other.

The data for this visualization was compiled from the NFL’s record book and records at NFL.com. You can view the original data source by clicking in the bottom left corner of the visualization.

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NBA Records by Player Feature

NBA Records by Player

This interactive data visualization shows the distribution of 176 unique NBA records by the players who own them. The user can filter the records on regular or postseason, type of record, and position. You can also hover over the gears in the top right corner to learn more about the methodology that went into creating this visualization.

The data for this visualization was gathered by combining the statistical records of every NBA and ABA player from basketball-reference.com. You can view the original data source by clicking in the bottom left corner of the visualization.

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U.S. Income by Age and Marital Status

U.S. Income by Age and Marital Status

This interactive data visualization shows the distribution of adjusted gross income for U.S. citizens. The user can explore the data by age, marital (or filing) status, and income. No interactions are recorded.

The data source for  this visualization is 147,351,308 tax returns filed with the IRS in 2013. The 2013 tax year was the most recent data released by the IRS when this visualization was developed. You can view the original data source by clicking in the bottom left corner of the visualization.

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wheres-ryan-portfolio

Where’s Ryan?

This visualization provides a schedule and map of Tableau presentations and training events with Ryan Sleeper in 2017. Hovering over the 90-day timeline or map will highlight the event; clicking on an event will bring you to the registration (when applicable).

The full list of events is also under the visualization. Events will be added regularly throughout the year, so please subscribe to stay in touch. If you’re interested in a Tableau presentation or training with Ryan, please contact ryan@ryansleeper.com.

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how-does-your-household-income-rank-feature

How does your household income rank?

This is an interactive data visualization that shows the percentile ranks of all US household incomes between $2,000 and $450,000. By default, the visualization is set to the median US household income of $55,000. The end user has the ability to use the slider under the household income amount to choose any household income between $2,000 and $450,000. Upon changing the location of the slider, the household income amount will update and the amount will be represented on the curve with a caption of that specific household income’s ranking. A household income of $2,000 falls into the first percentile, or a percentile ranking of 99. A household income of $450,000 is in the 99th percentile, or a percentile ranking of first.

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My Tableau Public Viz View Counter

My Tableau Public Viz Views

This interactive data visualization shows the total number of views my Tableau Public visualizations have received, progress to my goal of reaching one million views, view counts for every viz, and the highest Tableau Public honor each viz has received. The end user can hover over the bar chart to see the name and rank of the visualization and click on any bar to view the full interactive version of the data visualization.

The data for this visualization was sourced from my Tableau Public profile page using import.io and imported into Google Sheets.

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my-us-stock-portfolio-portfolio

My US Stock Portfolio

This interactive data visualization was created to track my portfolio of US stocks. The box in the upper left-hand corner of the dashboard displays the weighted average return across all of the stocks in the portfolio. Each stock ‘widget’ displays the most recent PPS, or Price Per Share, and what the PPS was on the day I acquired the stock. Dividing today’s PPS by the Day 1 PPS generates the percentage gain or loss. The sparklines display how the percentage gain or loss has trended since the first day I owned the stock. The end user can also hover over data points for additional information. Lastly, the title bars for each stock will change color based on whether their respective overall returns have been positive or negative.

My US Stock Portfolio was created with a ‘mobile-first’ design. Viewing the visualization on a phone results in a single column of stacked widgets while viewing on a desktop device displays a three-column by four-row table.

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Project Rally Mantis

Project Rally Mantis

Project Rally Mantis was created to track the Kansas City Royals’ prospects of reaching the 2016 MLB Playoffs for a chance to defend their World Series title. If you would like to follow along throughout the rest of the season, simply bookmark / visit projectrallymantis.com – which will open a full screen version of the interactive data visualization.

To interact with the visualization, start by selecting the number of wins the Royals will need to make the playoffs based on your level of optimism. By default, number of wins needed to make the playoffs is set to 90.

On desktop, you can hover over any data point on the line graph to see how many wins the Royals had at various points in the season. You can also hover over the circles, which represent a schedule of remaining games, to see the Royals remaining opponents and their current form. On a mobile device, you can get the same information by clicking on data points.

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The Fastest People on Earth

The Fastest People on Earth

This interactive data visualization shows the race time for every medalist in the Olympics 100-meter event. This event began in 1896 for men and 1928 for women. I was inspired to make this visualization by this infographic from the New York Times. I wanted to take their well-done piece a couple of steps further by including women and making the results interactive.  The user can click on Men or Women in the top left corner of the visualization to filter the track accordingly. The user can also hover over any data point to see the athlete, time, country, year, and medal won. I was aiming for a minimalist design with great user experience. I challenged myself to complete the visualization from start to finish in one hour (which I almost accomplished).

The data for this visualization was sourced from databaseolympics.com. You can view the data source and inspiration for this visualization by clicking the links at the bottom.

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What collisions cause the most NFL concussions

What Collisions Cause the Most Concussions in the NFL?

This interactive data visualization shows the distribution of NFL concussions during the last four seasons by collision source including another helmet, body part, and playing surface. The user can hover over the stacked bar chart on the left or player heat map on the right to filter the four-year trend and see additional information.

The data source for this visualization is the data from the 618 concussions that occurred during the NFL regular season from 2012 – 2015. The pieces of data are provided by the 2015 NFL Injury Data report from NFL Communications. You can view the original data source by clicking in the bottom left corner of the visualization.

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jackie-robinson-2

Jackie Robinson vs. Every Player Before Him

This interactive data visualization shows Jackie Robinson’s offensive statistics compared to every single player with at least 100 at bats before his debut on April 15th, 1947. There were 7.424 total players and 3,807 players with at least 100 at bats between 1876 and Jackie’s debut in 1947.

The visualization is a scatter plot with the chosen statistic on the vertical Y-axis and seasons played on the horizontal X-axis. The end user can choose from a variety of offensive statistics including hits, doubles, triples, home runs, runs, RBIs, hits by pitch, stolen bases, strikeouts, and walks. Upon making a selection, the visualization will update and a line is drawn to show how Jackie Robinson performed compared to the 95th percentile among all of the players.

The data for this visualization was source from seanlahman.com’s baseball database.

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